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Tanzanian students prepare for national exams

In June, So They Can took 25 top students from our partner schools in Babati District to the city of Moshi for practice examinations. This is part of our strategy to help partner schools become some of the best-performing schools in Tanzania.

The students are practicing for their Standard 7 national examinations, the most important stepping stone in Tanzania’s primary school curriculum. Students who do not pass these exams are not allowed to continue to Standard 8, and they are not allowed to repeat the exams.

“We need a lot of practice to be ready, more confident.” – Loveness Elsante, Endanaga Primary School student

Charles Fabian, the Education Coordinator for Mamire Ward (a ward of 10 schools within Babati District), joined us on the trip.

“Last year the percentage of failure was about 16 percent for primary schools in the Mamire Ward,” he says. “Before So They Can started helping, the failure was higher. Now more students are passing, and the ones that are passing are getting better marks.

“We are expecting this year for Mamire Ward, a pass rate of 100 percent for Standard 7. That is our target.”

“These exams are important, there are a lot of benefits. Comparison with other students. New friends, discussions.” – Gidion Huseni, Halu Primary School student

This is the second year So They Can has facilitated these high-performing practice exams in Tanzania. This year our students sat their practice exams alongside students from Majengo Primary School, one of the best-performing schools in Moshi.

“That’s why we decided to come here,” Charles says. “So we can compare the level of our children with those in this school, and improve the level of passing for our children.”

“This makes me more confident for the September examinations,” – Menye Lowasa, Mwikantsi Primary School student

Henry Mwanga, a teacher at Kwaraa Primary School – one of the participant schools – says this is the first time many of these children have travelled away from Babati.

“The students gain confidence because they have met new friends and they can now compete. They will improve the academic scores, and get geographical skills on the journey from Babati to Moshi,” he says.

“So They Can have facilitated transport and all costs for the trip. So They Can also helps facilitate end-of-year examinations for Standard 1, 2, 4 and 7.”

“It makes me more competent for my subjects.” – Jamal Hasani, Endanoga Primary School student

Many schools in Tanzania struggle to pay for the basics needed for official examinations: paper, printing, photocopying, supervisors’ time. Practice exams help students prepare and increase the pass rate, but they are often unaffordable.

“I am gaining more knowledge.” – Josephat Lucas, Endadoshi Primary School student

Tanzanian Exam students

Students who sat Tanzanian Exams

 

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